Tag Archives: stress

Delicious, Stress Reducing Snacks and Meals

For one reason or another it is probably a good bet that any given American is probably still feeling extra stress. Here are some foods that provide nutrients to help reduce that stress. Not only that, enjoy one of these meals in your ideal conditions during an hour or so dinner with your family or partner could add to that stress reduction. Take some time away and enjoy a delicious meal with someone you love. Or take a meditative moment to yourself and concentrate on flavors of new snack or lunch.

Potato chips and other crunchy snacks can be replaced with apple slices. The satisfying crunch can release stress.

A paella of clams and mussels is a major such of B-12 which will even your mood.

A desert of fresh sliced kiwi dipped in dark chocolate would further improve one’s mood with a boost of vitamin C.

Grilled salmon can be a great source for your omega-3 fatty acids, which are well known to reduce stress.

Green peas in an omelet can turn your favorite egg dish into serotonin production booster.

Yogurt’s probiotics can help reduce levels of cortisol. Add berries for vitamin C

Matcha tea in particular contains the relaxing theanine.

 

 

 

Simple Stress Reduction Techniques

One thing you can do to reduce stress is exercise. Scientist think that this will increase blood circulation to the brain, especially areas like the amygdala and hippocampus. These regulate motivation, mood and response to stress. One thing exercise will do is release the body’s so-called feel-good hormones. Scientists have found that it only takes exercise intensity of a moderate level to reduce depression.

Some scientists believe that high impact interval exercise can actually increase stress and inflammation. This is especially true for those who are not used to exercise.
Exercise will also improve your sleep quality which is another thing you can do to relieve stress.

But it isn’t just sleeping more. You are giving your body time to go through enough cycles of sleep to repair itself.

To promote this develop a routine. One wants to teach the body and brain to calm down and get ready for bed about an hour before bedtime. Turn off your devices and TV. A warm bath or shower, reading, listening to relaxing music, meditation, light stretches are all activities that can signal your brain its almost time for sleep. Experts even say you should keep a weekend schedule as well.

Something as simple as taking deep, slow breaths can do amazing things to our brain and therefore our stress, experts said.

Taking deep breaths can do great things for our brain and therefor our stress, scientists say. Learning breathwork gives you the ability to control your own brain to an extent.
When you are able to psychologically calm yourself, you change your brainwaves. Deep breathing realigns the sympathetic system, the source of stress in the body.

These are just a few things you can do to keep yourself stress free that don’t cost you any money and that you can start working on today.

Food that help keep you fit

Jody Victor found an aricle from ABC News that tells us about some foods to help get us in shape. Here is their list:

Beet juice: aids in stamina. They state that research shows it may be more effective than caffeine.
Honey: help with endurance. Consuming honey before exercise acts like a “time-released” fuel keeping sugar and insulin levels steady longer.
Pea protein: delays muscle fatigue. You can this in powder form. Since it’s rich in amino acids it can delay fatigue during exercise.
Blueberries: reduces inflammation. When fresh blueberries aren’t available, you can use dried or freeze-dried berries.
Tart cherries: fight pain and regain strength. In a test, it was found that drinking 12 oz of tart cherry juice twice a day helped them gain strength. Frozen, dried, or juice options.
Salmon: to build muscle. Omega-3 fatty acids may also be a muscle booster. Try to include wild salmon in meals a few times a week, or even salmon jerky.
Watermelon: reduces muscle soreness. It was found that watermelon juice helped relieve muscle soreness when drinking about 16oz an hour before exercise. ‘
Pomegranate: muscle strength recovery. It was found by researchers that it helps improve muscle recovery. About 4 ounces of juice was enough to help improve muscle soreness/weakness.
Coffee: for next-day energy. It helps replenish glycogen more rapidly after exercise.
Watercress: reduce DNA damage. It counters the “wear and tear” of exercise. 3 oz. of fresh watercress was enough.
Dark chocolate: curb exercise-induced stress. In a study, the men who consumed 3.5 oz. dark chocolate before 2 1/2 hours of cycling experienced higher blood anti-oxidant levels. Yum!

~ Steve Victor

Whooping Cough Outbreak

The United States is having the worst whooping cough outbreak in modern times. The previous record of 27,550 cases was set in 2010. 2012 is on track to shatter that record as the country has seen 32,131 reported cases already (through September 15). I asked Jody Victor®  to tell us more about it.

Jody Victor®: The top ten states with reported cases are: Wisconsin, Washington, Minnesota, New York, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Texas, Iowa, Colorado, and Utah. Eight of those states allow parents to exempt their children from required immunizations (only New York and Iowa do not). Those eight states account for 56 percent of all the whooping cough cases in the United States.

Pertussis, commonly known as whooping cough, is an upper respiratory infection caused by the Bordetella pertussis or Bordetella parapertussis bacteria. Whooping cough gets its popular name from the whoop sound that the patient makes after a coughing fit as he/she is trying to take a breath. (The whoop noise is rare in patients under 6 months of age and in adults.) Whooping cough can affect people of any age. It is a highly contagious and serious disease that can cause permanent disability in infants, even death.

Initial symptoms are similar to the common cold and develop about a week after exposure to the bacteria. Severe episodes of coughing start about ten days later, long after a common cold should be gone. Coughing spells may lead to vomiting or a short loss of consciousness. Whooping cough should always be considered when vomiting occurs with coughing. With infants choking spells are also common.

If started early enough, antibiotics such as erythromycin can make the symptoms go away more quickly. Unfortunately most patients are diagnosed too late and antibiotics are not very effective, though the medicine can help reduce the patient’s ability to spread the disease.

Pertussis/ whooping cough, is a preventable disease and yet it is still a problem.  In 2005, DTaP replaced the old “whole cell” pertussis vaccine called DTP, which often caused severe side effects. Currently five doses of DTaP (diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus) are given to children before they enter school. The vaccine is administered at 2, 4, and 6 months and again at 15 to 18 months and at 4 to 6 years. It is currently recommended that children get a booster shot at age 11 or 12.

A new study by researchers at the Kaiser Permanente Vaccine Study Center in Oakland, California, has documented for the first time how quickly DTaP immunity can wear off. Dr. Nicola P. Klein, head of the study, and colleagues showed that even after all five doses of the new a-cellular vaccine were properly administered, protection against pertussis waned during the next 5 years. They also found that the infected children were surprisingly young- 8 to 11- not the teenagers who were historically the most infected during prior outbreaks. “The old vaccine lasted longer,” says Dr. Klein, “Originally we didn’t think this vaccine would be substantially different from the old one.”

The new evidence on whooping cough shows that the booster vaccine should be given earlier, perhaps at 8 or nine years of age, to protect children in their preteens. The same booster is currently recommended as a one-time injection for adults through age 64 in lieu of a 10-year tetanus shot. As researchers study the longevity of DTaP they may soon recommend a booster for adults every ten years instead of a one-time booster.

Babies who are not fully immunized and have not yet built up their own immunities to diseases are especially vulnerable to pertussis. Babies who are not fully immunized may develop pneumonia, severe breathing problems, and terrifying seizures. It is vitally important that anyone who has routine contact with infants should be immunized against pertussis. That would include all day care workers, nannies, babysitters, and grandparents. If pregnant women have not recently had a booster shot, the CDC recommends that it be given late in the second trimester or early in the third.

Dr. Klein has stated, “Although a better vaccine is needed, the current vaccine is safe and effective, and some protection is better than no protection.”

 Thanks, Jody!

All the Best!

Steve Victor

Type 3 Diabetes and Alzheimer’s

Thirty-five million people suffer today from Alzheimer’s disease worldwide. That number is projected to rise to 100 million by 2050. I asked Jody Victor® to tell us more about it.

Jody Victor®: Many scientists now believe that Alzheimer’s is caused largely by the brain’s impaired response to insulin. Suzanne de la Monte and her research team at the U.S. Brown Medical School discovered that, similar to what happens in the pancreas, insulin is released in the hippocampus of the brain as well. Your brain creates its own insulin.

The research team also found that brain insulin is not affected by the level of glucose in the blood as in Type 1 Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes.  But any trouble with the release of insulin in the brain does contribute to Type 3 Diabetes. With Type 3 Diabetes the brain produces lower than normal levels of brain insulin. When brain cells are deprived of insulin they eventually die, causing memory loss and other degenerative diseases.

The new phenomenon Type 3 Diabetes strengthens scientists’ belief that people with diabetes have an increased risk of suffering from Alzheimer’s, a degenerative brain disorder, by up to 65 percent. There is now strong evidence that Alzheimer’s could be caused by the very same choices that cause Type 2 Diabetes: poor diet loaded with bad fats, sugars, and salt. Almost daily we receive more and more evidence that the food choices we make can have a profound effect on our health.

Thanks, Jody!

All the Best!

Steve Victor