Monthly Archives: September 2018

Dairy or No Dairy?

There seems to be so much controversy over whether or not dairy is good for you. There are those who say full-fat is better than no-fat. Why all these different takes on this?

Some may say milk for each species is made for that species. Milk is even mentioned in the Bible when they talk of a land flowing with milk and honey. Curds are mentioned as well, so perhaps they found that cheese is made from milk.

Many people are lactose intolerant and cannot consume dairy products. Even when lactose intolerant, some can consume fermented dairy such as yogurt or higher fat content products like butter.

Full-fat dairy also is known to actually lower the risk of obesity despite the higher calorie value – most likely due to a fuller feeling it will give. Also the fats themselves are beneficial and there are vitamins present you won’t find in the lower fat versions.

It is up to you to go with what is best for you. If you have lactase problems, stick with non-dairy. If you don’t have a problem with fats, go for full-fat milk.

It’s breakfast! Time for your glyphosate!

UGH! EWG (Environmental Working Group) has found many types of oat-based cereals and products contain glyphosate. Glyphosate is used to kill weeds. It is an herbicide by Monsanto marketed as Roundup. In 2015, WHO said it was “probably carcinogenic in humans” but later changed it to give ranges of 1mg/kg body weight per day to be what may be toxic. That’s about 45.36 mg per 100 pounds of weight. In 2017, California listed it in their registry of chemicals known to cause cancer.

EWG tells us more than 250 million pounds of glyphosate are sprayed on American crops. In their study, they benchmarked 160ppb as a standard for health. Of the 45 conventional samples tested, 31 were above that benchmark; of the 16 organic products 0 were above that limit.

Farmers spray this just before harvest to help dry the plants out for harvest. You will not find this in your list of ingredients on your products.

https://www.ewg.org/

Smoked Watermelon? Cantaloupe Burgers?

While looking at Twitter one day, we found a post about a restaurant serving smoked watermelon. They serve it up like, and even make it look like ham. It it put in a bath and then put into a smoker. After it has smoked, it is scored and put in a pan with olive oil and spices. It is then sliced and served. It almost looks like ham. The woman in the video below says it looks a little like rare prime rib and that it tastes like nothing she’s had before. It comes from Ducks Eatery in New York. The chef was looking for options for vegans and vegetarians when dining with their meat-eating friends.

He also developed the cantaloupe burger. These items don’t happen quickly. They undergo a 2-day process to get the correct texture and taste they are looking for.

Cantaloupe Burger info

Physical Activity Recommendations from WHO

WHO (World Health Organization) has developed global recommendations for health. Their recommendations include frequency, duration, intensity, type, and total amount for three age groups, including 5-17 years old, 18-64 years old, and over 65.

For children 5-17 years old:
It is recommended that children should have at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous activity per day.
Over 60 minutes has greater benefits.
Most of the activity should be aerobic, but include muscle strengthening.

For adults aged 18-64:
The recommendation for this age group is 150 moderate-intensity aerobic activity through the week or 75 minutes vigorous-intensity activities.
Aerobic activity should be spurts of 10 minutes or more.
For added benefit, increase moderate-intensity to 300 minutes per week or 150 vigorous activity per week.
Muscle-strengthening should take place 2 or more days a week.

For adults over 65:
The recommendation is similar to aged 18-64: 150 minutes moderate-intensity aerobic or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity activity per week.
Aerobic in spurts of 10 minutes or more.
For more benefits, jump up moderate activity to 300 or 150 vigorous-intensity activity.
Older adults with poor mobility should work on balance and to prevent falls 3 or more days per week.
Muscle-strengthening 2 or more days per week.
If they cannot do the above, they should be as physically active as their abilities allow.

http://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/factsheet_recommendations/en/
http://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/publications/9789241599979/en/